Broadband Infrastructure Index (BII)

Update to December 2020

We have been scoring our Broadband Infrastructure Index (BII) since 2010. A low number/rank means high scores in terms of technology (typically FTTP), number of networks and services and downstream and upstream bandwidths along with other elements.

The BII is made up of the components below in Appendix 1.  The sum of those elements is then used to rank the areas, in this case Lower Super Output areas (LSOAs) in order of the quality of their retail broadband infrastructure.  A low number/rank means high scores in terms of technology (typically FTTP), number of networks and services and downstream and upstream bandwidths along with other elements.

The output rankings, relative to each other, give a useful indication of the current broadband infrastructure and using time series how that infrastructure as a whole has progressed, again relative to other areas.

 

Figure 2: 2020 Broadband Infrastructure Index – quintiles

It is not unexpected that more rural areas, which are also larger geographically, tend to rank poorly for infrastructure.  There is less RoI available primarily due  to low population density relative to urban areas.

The Government is attempting to address this with various programs.  However those are unlikely to result in the amount of choice of supplier that urban areas have. Openreach and those that operate on its’ network will provide a good service but there will not be as many alternative operators in Ofcom Area 3.Figure 3: BII 2020  London – quintiles

 

While many parts of London rank in the first quintile, up to 8452, there are areas that are relatively disadvantaged

The delta in BII rank from 2019 to 2020 can be represented by subtracting 2020 from 2019.  This will indicate to what extent an area has improved infrastructure relative to others.  So in the figure below those in black and grey have done well and those in pink and red have declined relative to the UK.

Figure 4: BII delta (2020 – 2019) London – quintiles

 

In the UK overall there have been signs of the build out from the alternative networks.  A red or pink area does not necessarily have terrible broadband infrastructure but just have not improved compared to other areas of the UK.

Subscribers can access the components of the BII and review in more depth what is behind the BII today and why the delta might be high or low.

 

Figure 5: BII delta (2020 – 2019) UK – quintiles

 

This output illustrates how the ranks for the LSOAs have changed during 2020.  If it is negative then the area has become relatively worse in terms of broadband infrastructure.

 


APPENDIX

 

 

 

The BII is made up of the components in Figure 6.  The sum of those elements is then used to rank the areas, in this case Lower Super Output areas (LSOAs) in order of the quality of their retail broadband infrastructure.  A low number/rank means high scores in terms of technology (typically FTTP), number of networks and services and downstream and upstream bandwidths along with other elements.

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 6: Components of the Broadband Infrastructure Index

 


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